SIGMUND FREUD DREAM INTERPRETATION BOOK

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The doctrine of dream-interpretation itself has evolved in a direction which was Even the material of this book, even my own dreams, defaced by time or. The Interpretation of Dreams (German: Die Traumdeutung) is an book by Sigmund Freud, the founder of psychoanalysis, in which the author introduces his . The Interpretation of Dreams book. Read reviews from the world's largest community for readers. Freud's discovery that the dream is the means by whic.


Sigmund Freud Dream Interpretation Book

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The standard edition of Sigmund Freud's classic work on the psychology and The Interpretation of Dreams and millions of other books are available for. Dreams, in Freud's view, are all forms of wish fulfillment — attempts by the unconscious to Dream Psychology fascinates me and I think this is a great book that. The interpretation of dreams is the via regia to a knowledge of the unconscious element in our Sigmund Freud Freud's See all books by Sigmund Freud.

Modern critics challenge terms such as 'penis envy' but he was still a genius. Is this book extremely outdated? Ivan Herrejon Nope. If you want to check out its relevance today read some of the material by Dr. See all 5 questions about The Interpretation of Dreams…. Lists with This Book. Community Reviews. Showing Rating details.

More filters. Sort order. View all 28 comments. Die Traumdeutung is an book by the psychoanalyst Sigmund Freud, in which the author introduces his theory of the unconscious with respect to dream interpretation, and discusses what would later become the theory of the Oedipus complex.

Freud revised the book at least eight times and, in the third edition, added an extensive section which treated dream symbolism very literally, following the influence of Wilhelm Stekel. Freud said of this work, "Insight such as this falls to one's lot but once in a lifetime. View all 9 comments. Jan 02, Glenn Russell rated it it was amazing. When he speaks about dreams and their interpretation, I am reminded of a microfiction I had published years ago where the editor told me it was the weirdest story he has ever read and that a Freudian psychoanalyst would have a field day interpreting.

Here it is below. If anyone would care to offer an interpretation according to Freud or any other school of psychoanalysis, I'm sure you could have some fun.

Hanging over the side upside-down, Sam had a view through a second floor bedroom window.

The lady of the house was completely naked. Her ample rear end was bobbing and swinging to a polka playing on an enormous ancient phonograph. Sidney yanked Sam back up to the roof but Sam became so excited in the process, he ejaculated his semen seed. By the time the seed popped out of the bottom of his dungarees, rolled off the roof and landed in the yard, it was the size of a cantaloupe. From all corners of the yard kids skipped over and began frolicking with the seed.

Its round contour grew to the size of a watermelon in their hands. Sam stared down at the kids. He began a high-step gleeful dance, part mazurka, part gavotte, part rumba, part hornpipe right there on the roof, bottom to top, edge to edge, twirling like some enchanted wood nymph, his pot belly jiggling in pure ecstasy.

Verea, made his way up the ladder. Sam pirouetted daintily at the peak, doffing his baseball cap. Vera pushed Sidney rudely. Verea back. A rapid-fire shoving match ensued along the entire length of the roof. At the same time Sam fluttered down on tiptoe, scooped up an armful of shingles and started putting them in place.

A fully-dressed Mrs. Verea made her appearance at the head of the ladder. Stepping up from the ladder to the roof Mrs. Verea kicked her husband in the pants. He stopped shoving Sidney, turned around and started shoving her, whereupon she too started shoving him furiously. Sidney fanned himself with his baseball cap and looked over at his brother — just now, between acrobatic leaps of a saltarello, Sam placed the last of the shingles on the tar.

As if he were at the court of Louis XIV, Sidney curtsied gracefully, then pointed to the ladder before climbing down himself. Sam followed, hips swinging but fell between the rungs. There was nothing for Sidney to do but guide the ladder, with his brother stuck in it, to the van. The kids approached; they held the distended seed, the shape and length of a garden hose now: When Sam jiggled and kicked down the driveway, the kids shook the magnificent seed, each shake casting out fine gold dust that turned to streams of water when it touched the earth.

View all 18 comments. View 1 comment. Mar 25, Trevor rated it it was amazing Shelves: This was a much more interesting book than I thought it might be. The nature of dreams is something that is hard not to find fascinating. The thing is that we spend quite a bit of time dreaming — not the third of our lives we spend sleeping, but enough time to make us wonder why we dream at all.

It seems incomprehensible that our dreams would be completely meaningless. But then, they can be so bizarre it is hard to know just what they might mean. Freud starts with a quick run through how dreams This was a much more interesting book than I thought it might be. Freud starts with a quick run through how dreams have been interpreted in the past — from Aristotle on.

Aristotle is a good place to start, as he says we dream about things that have been left unresolved from the day — and this is a core idea that Freud also includes in his theory of dreams.

The Interpretation of Dreams by Sigmund Freud

Essentially, Freud sees dreams as playing a key role in helping us to process stuff that happened during the day. But dreams are a truth that likes to hide.

Their meaning covers itself in remarkable allusions and images that are often amusingly apt, but sometimes it is as if we are determined to hide the true meaning of our dreams even from ourselves. To Freud it is impossible to understand and interpret dreams from a list of standard symbols. Symbols develop their own meanings within the text that is the dream.

And the dream is relevant to the immediate life of the dreamer. It is generally a response to what happened that day — even if the imagery used may well refer back to the childhood of the dreamer so that the deeper significance is a life's work. The other remarkable conclusion Freud draws is that dreams are wish fulfilments. Now, this seems anything but obvious.

Sure, when we have dreams we are having sex with super-models it is pretty obvious that Freud is onto something. It is here that Freud discusses the Oedipal Complex — how our first sexual attraction is toward the parent of the opposite sex to ourselves and therefore we desire to remove one parent from the scene so as to take their place. While we are children the full implications of this desire are obscure to us — but as we grow older the taboo associated with this desire helps suppress our recognition of these desires, or repress them, rather — but only from the conscious mind.

The subconscious mind still remembers what we might prefer to forget and so uses these images, as the first images of our awakening desires, as potent images in our dreams. Time for a story. I once worked with a woman called Frances Nolan. But every morning I would be walking to the train station and when I got to a certain part of Church Street she would suddenly jump into my head as large as life.

I was starting to think that I must have been starting to fall for her — it was the strangest feeling, and quite confusing. Until one day I realised that there is a shoe shop in Church Street that is called Frances Nolan Shoes — and the sign is huge and I would walk under it every day.

This book is interesting as I had assumed it would be a much harder read than it turned out to be — I also thought it would be a much sillier book than it turned out too. It is extremely well written. My main problems with his theory have to do with Sherlock Holmes. It even gets to the stage where he says that sometimes things mean the opposite of what they seem to mean in the dream.

When that is the case then any interpretation is basically about imposing ones preconceptions on the meaning of the symbols in the dream. And whether it is dream images or tarot cards or ink dots on paper — our making sense of random images says interesting things about us. But we should go gently into this stuff.

We should go on tip-toes. Because stories have lives of their own and we are weaker than a good story and always will be. I once read a book called Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain. I think in that book she says that lines have a momentum that is very hard to control — but controlling the momentum of lines is a large part of what drawing is about.

Stories also have a momentum that is very hard to control. The narratives we tell about ourselves are one thing — the narrative we tell about our dreams are quite another.

Personally, I think I prefer Freudian readings of novels to Freudian readings of people — but I can certainly see why this book made such an impact. If the problem with the book is Freud playing Holmes, it is only a problem because he is so damn clever he gets away with it.

It is a fascinating read, even if it has left me somewhat less than convinced. View all 45 comments. May 16, Alok Mishra rated it liked it. I have read various editions of various books claiming to interpret the dreams we see while we are unconscious or subconscious. However, the book by Freud is different.

Being a psychologist and a famous one, his interpretations are mostly based on popular beliefs, culture and analysis. In the Indian context, much of it cannot be exemplified. Still, the book is fine and noteworthy even today. I dreamt that I had written a huge modern rewrite of Moby-Dick , except instead of a whale they were hunting a badger.

The Interpretation of Dreams

Instead of the Pequod, Ahab and the narrator cycled through the forest on a tandem bicycle, studying tracks and peering through the I dreamt that I had written a huge modern rewrite of Moby-Dick , except instead of a whale they were hunting a badger. Instead of the Pequod, Ahab and the narrator cycled through the forest on a tandem bicycle, studying tracks and peering through the shrubs.

The white badger! In my mind this was a serious literary project. Unfortunately I have never finished Moby-Dick , and so the book just devolved into chapters full of interminable facts about badger biology, lifestyle and cultural history, and the foundational role they play in the mythology of countless woodland societies which is not true.

If anyone can interpret this for me, I am all ears. In the meantime, if you'll excuse me I now have , words to write about badger-hunting. View all 15 comments. View all 8 comments.

Oct 27, Rebecca McNutt rated it it was ok Shelves: Is it just me, or was ol' Mr. Freud the biggest perv in the world of psychology? Don't get me wrong, this is an interesting read from a historical perspective, but it's so difficult to take seriously!

According to Freud, what is really lurking beneath the surface of your dreams?

It's also very dated and seems to follow the average family of the time, without taking into account anyone who doesn't fit into what was "proper" back then. View 2 comments. Jun 15, Owlseyes on notre dame, it's so strange a hour blaze and A major book of as one of the possible approaches to the world of dreams. Freud starts with Aristotle and the demoniac view ; then, the biblical approach viewing dreams as "Divine inspiration". Next, he proceeds with a very exhaustive sample of dreams of his own, of historical characters Napoleon I, Xerxes Though "absurd" they may look, they are meaningful, t A major book of as one of the possible approaches to the world of dreams.

Though "absurd" they may look, they are meaningful, they can be interpreted. This absurdity is due to unconscious mechanisms which disguise the true meaning of the dream, namely, via "displacement" and "condensation". Our language is also an obstacle: And Freud was good at it. Curiously, he took some lines on this woman telling his mother about how a "great man" he would become; he speculated about a "minister" So he made some changes on his model of the psyche.

Hypnos and Thanatos: Those dreams happened to people before the Obama election. They perceived a link between the re-election and the feared "upcoming events". Surely, those were dreams of the future; no pleasure-principle operating. I'm glad they didn't "materialize". That, of course we cannot consider.

One feels inclined to substitute: For the dream originates from the past in every sense. To be sure the ancient belief that the dream reveals the future is not entirely devoid of truth. Feb 16, Dimitri rated it really liked it. Freud covers everything from the content within dreams to the strategies needed to interpret them, as well as diving in to the finer aspects such as memory in dreams and connections to everyday life.

Freud often quotes the extensive research that has already been done in the field of the analysis of dreams but points out that all of the work so far has been inconclusive and in essence raised more questions than it answered. In this work Freud does his best to definitively answer the questions that we still had about interpreting our dreams.

I thought that this book was really fascinating because it answered many of my research questions about the way our subconscious mind is connected to the events of our everyday lives and our memories.

He pointed out that people often have dreams about some finite detail that they would never have expected to remember. This passage was so striking because he answered some of my questions about whether our subconscious thoughts are connected to our everyday life.

It also made me realize how powerful our mind is and the fact that we actually pick up so many details in everyday life that we might toss away as insignificant but arise in our dreams. Jan 10, Alexia rated it it was ok. Written with scientific denseness, but lacks scientific rigor or clarity. Can be tedious, vague and confusing.

Freud will say he's going to do something like not use personal examples only to forget he said that and do it anyway. Or he'll acknowledge the flaw with his approach and then do nothing to correct it which is better than not admitting it, I guess.

For example, he uses his patients, "neurotics", for analysis and comments on how how that makes his conclusions not drawn from a represe Written with scientific denseness, but lacks scientific rigor or clarity. For example, he uses his patients, "neurotics", for analysis and comments on how how that makes his conclusions not drawn from a representative sample.

But that comment is where it stops, there's no correction or real analysis on how that impacted his conclusions. Or he'll start out with a clear sentence and then explain it until it descends into an illogical jumble.

Or he'll refer to something not obvious as something obvious. Or he'll say there's numerous instances of something and then not list them. I could go on. He gives too many examples, belabors the points he does end up making, references confusing German word play I'm not going to make the same mistake as Frued.

I'm going to stop talking once my point is made. And I think it's made. Jan 28, Jana rated it really liked it Shelves: This was one of those books I tried to read on my own back as a young college student.

It wasn't a part of any coursework, so I didn't have anyone to help tie it to larger ideas. If I remember, I think I ended up making my own wacky meaning out of it But then I re-read it in grad school in the context of Freud's other work and it began to make a bit more sense. I liked his hypothetical "primal language" because it suggests the e This was one of those books I tried to read on my own back as a young college student.

I liked his hypothetical "primal language" because it suggests the existence of symbols as independent of verbal language, which as a visual artist is a notion I'm deeply invested in. This "language" is not then something that is "used" in dreams as a translation from CSNESS, but rather its own more subtle and fluid independent organization of meaning.

The "language" is non-linear and non-chronological. When I think about this idea, I'm reminded of Rapael's Transfiguration: This is one of those pieces where the artist is able to represent in images one above the other simultaneous occurrences which can only be read in the original text as one after the other and then reflected upon as simultaneous.

This play with time is something I like to do in my own work, especially in pulling stills from time-based media so the viewer can enter the work at will rather than be held captive by it as in, watching a sequence from beginning to end.

Internet media satisfy a similar urge. View all 4 comments. May 23, SmarterLilac rated it it was amazing. This is one of the books that helped me understand Freud's genius, as well as the value of psychoanalysis. It hurts me so that fewer and fewer people want to understand or appreciate Freud. Yes, I realize that the Freudian perspective, especially on things like dream interpretation, has limited value in non-Western cultures, and that for some, dream interpretation itself may not be the most insightful way to understand the subconscious.

Still--come on. This book changed Europe, and the course of This is one of the books that helped me understand Freud's genius, as well as the value of psychoanalysis. This book changed Europe, and the course of history, as well as humankind's awareness of our inner lives. I love it. May 08, Amit Mishra rated it really liked it.

Freud's treatment of unconsciousness and subconsciousness mind is really different and opens up a long way to explore something new in this field. His ideas provided a fresh new world to explore the opportunity. Before his writings, the unconsciousness mind was just an image that can not be explained by any scientific explanation.

Dec 09, Nicholas Spies rated it really liked it. Whatever you think of Sigmund Freud's theories, you have to admit that at least in English translation he is a very good and persuasive writer. That he was a very important influence on the history of the 20th century is an understatement, particularly since his nephew, Edward Bernays, is known as the Inventor of Advertising.

Bernays essentially created the consumer culture that has dominated the US and much of the Western world for the last 80 years or so. He did so by changing the basis by wh Whatever you think of Sigmund Freud's theories, you have to admit that at least in English translation he is a very good and persuasive writer.

He did so by changing the basis by which consumers judge products. Before Bernays, products were presented in a factual manner, emphasizing their virtues, dimensions, capacities and whatever, allowing the consumer to make a relatively rational and dispassionate choices between the products of different manufacturers. Bernays, in constant contact with his uncle, saw an opportunity to apply Freud's ideas of the subconscious origins of behavior and the primacy of sexual desires, to essentially change the customer from the rational decision maker of classical economic theory to a malleable zombie, whose decisions are based on the presentation of products as being sexy or assuring popularity and the like--separating the desirability of products from their actual function.

This was painful, but unavoidable; I had to put up with the inevitable in order not to be obliged to forego altogether the demonstration of the truth of my psychological results. To be sure, I could not at best resist the temptation of disguising some of my indiscretions through omissions and substitutions, and as often as this happened it detracted materially from the value of the examples which I employed.

I can only express the hope that the reader of this work, putting himself in my difficult position, will show forbearance, and also that all persons who are inclined to take offence at any of the dreams reported will concede freedom of thought at least to the dream life. My colleagues in psychiatry, apparently, have made no effort to shake off the first surprise which my new conception of the dream evoked, and the professional philosophers, who are accustomed to treat the problem of dream life as a part of the states of consciousness, devoting to it a few—for the most part identical—sentences, have apparently failed to observe that in this field could be found all kinds of things which would inevitably lead to a thorough transformation of our psychological theories.

The behaviour of the scientific critics could only justify the expectation that this work of mine was destined to be buried in oblivion; and the small troop of brave pupils who follow my leadership in the medical application of psychoanalysis, and also follow my example in analysing dreams in order to utilise these analyses in the treatment of neurotics, would not have exhausted the first edition of the book.

I therefore feel indebted to that wider circle of intelligent seekers after truth whose co-operation has procured for me the invitation to take up anew, after nine years, the difficult and in so many respects fundamental work.

I am glad to be able to say that I have found little to change. Here and there I have inserted new material, added new views from my wider experience, and attempted to revise certain points; but everything essential concerning the dream and its interpretation, as well as the psychological propositions derived from it, has remained unchanged: at least, subjectively, it has stood the test of time. During the long years of my work on the problems of the neuroses, I have been repeatedly confronted with doubts, and have often made mistakes; but it was always in the "interpretation of dreams" that I found my bearings.

My numerous scientific opponents, therefore, show an especially sure instinct when they refuse to follow me into this territory of dream investigation. Likewise, the material used in this book to illustrate the rules of dream interpretation, drawn chiefly from dreams of my own which have been depreciated and outstripped by events, have in the revision shown a persistence which resisted substantial changes.

For me, indeed, the book has still another subjective meaning which I could comprehend only after it had been completed. It proved to be for me a part of my self-analysis, a reaction to the death of my father—that is, to the most significant event, the deepest loss, in the life of a man. After I recognised this I felt powerless to efface the traces of this influence. For the reader, however, it makes no difference from what material he learns to value and interpret dreams.

Berchtesgaden, Summer of I have reason to be pleased with this change; but, just as I have not considered the earlier neglect of my work on the part of the reader as a proof of its unworthiness, I am unable to find in the interest manifested at present a proof of its excellence.

The progress in scientific knowledge has shown its influence on the Interpretation of Dreams. When I wrote it in the "Sexual Theories" was not yet in existence, and the analysis of complicated forms of psychoneuroses was still in its infancy. The interpretation of dreams was destined to aid in the psychological analysis of the neuroses, but since then the deeper understanding of the neuroses has reacted on our conception of the dream.

The study of dream interpretation itself has continued to develop in a direction upon which not enough stress was laid in the first edition of this book. From my own experience, as well as from the works of W. Stekel and others, I have since learned to attach a greater value to the extent and the significance of symbolism in dreams or rather in the unconscious thinking.

The Interpretation of Dreams

Thus much has accumulated in the course of this year which requires consideration. I have endeavoured to do justice to this new material by numerous insertions in the text and by the addition of footnotes.The lady of the house was completely naked. Unfortunately I have never finished Moby-Dick , and so the book just devolved into chapters full of interminable facts about badger biology, lifestyle and cultural history, and the foundational role they play in the mythology of countless woodland societies which is not true.

During sleep, the unconscious condenses, displaces, and forms representations of the dream content, the latent content of which is often unrecognizable to the individual upon waking. In the Indian context, much of it cannot be exemplified. I dreamt that I had written a huge modern rewrite of Moby-Dick , except instead of a whale they were hunting a badger. No one should expect the interpretation of his dreams t fall into his lap effortlessly. That, of course we cannot consider.