A PIANO CHORD BOOK YOU CAN ACTUALLY USE

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A Piano Chord Book You Can Actually Use! [Aaron Whitehead] on ritipulmama.ga *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. This book offers a fresh look at how to. This revolutionary book makes learning chords simple. Take the information presented here and use it to learn your favorite song on the piano. Arranged in an. Mar 30, The Paperback of the A Piano Chord Book You Can Actually Use! by Aaron Whitehead at Barnes & Noble. FREE Shipping on $ or more!.


A Piano Chord Book You Can Actually Use

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Mar 30, This book offers a fresh look at how to learn chords on the piano. Made with the beginning piano player in mind, this book is perfect for the. This book offers a fresh look at how to learn chords on the piano. Made with the beginning piano player in mind, this book is perfect for the person desiring to. Mar 30, A Piano Chord Book You Can Actually Use! by Aaron Whitehead, , available at Book Depository with free delivery worldwide.

In Lesson 5 well learn how to stand em on their heads, and therefore triple the number of major chords we can play quickly! All The Minor Chords If you recall, in Lesson 2 we took an airplane ride over Chordland just to get the lay of the landthe overview of the world of chords. Then in Lesson 3 we showed you how easy it is to learn ALL the major chords there are 12 of them and be able to play them in seconds. Today we are going to cover All 12 of the Minor Chords!

Like we did with major chords, practice playing the first 3 chords over and over until you can move between them smoothly and quickly.

Then practice the next 3 minor chords then the next 3 minor chordsthen the last 3 minor chords. Then finally practice playing all 12 minor chords without stopping. Then play them in major-minor sequence: In other words, C major then C minor; F major then F minor; G major then G minor, and so on through the 12 chords.

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Now you have 24 chords under your belt12 major and 12 minor. Nowto see if you were paying attention, let me give you a little test. One of the minor chords above has one key that is mislabeled. Can you find it? Thats it for this lesson. With a weeks practice you ought to be a pro at all the major and minor chordsevery single one.

In the next lesson well learn how to stand em on their headsall major chords and all minor chords, and therefore triple the number of chords we can play quickly from 24 to 72!

Then in Lesson 2 we took an airplane ride over Chordland just to get the lay of the landthe overview of the world of chords. Lesson 3 showed you how easy it is to learn ALL the major chords there are 12 of them and be able to play them in seconds.

In Lesson 4 you learned how to easily turn major chords into minor chords just by moving one key one-half stepby lowering the 3rd of the major chord. In this lesson we are going to cover chords upside downchords that stand on their head. If I was strong enough to pick you up and stand you on your head, would you be a different person?

Of course not. You would still be you. And yet many people get all confused when chords are turned upside down. They recognize them when they are in root position, but when you stand em on their head.

Play each major chord in root position, then 1st inversion, then 2nd inversion. Play each chord up and down the keyboard for at least 2 octavesmaybe 3 octaves. Play them with your left hand, then play them with your right hand. Then play them hands together. Go through all 12 major chords, inverting every one.

Then go through all the 12 minor chords, inverting each one up and down the keyboardhands alone, then hands together. When you can do that you ought to feel really optimistic about learning chords, because youve got a great start. After all, you have gone from: which means you can play 72 piano chords!

Next lesson we will add 12 more chords to our growing list of chords we can play. Well take up diminished triads, and youll see how easy they are to learn once you know major and minor chords! Then we learned inversions in Lesson 5how to stand chords on their head. In this lesson we are going to diminished triads. And heres what they look like on the keyboard: Now its up to you. Play each diminished triad in root position, then 1st inversion, then 2nd inversion.

Finally, go through all 12 diminished chords, inverting each one up and down the keyboardeach hand alone, then together. Then skip around from major to minor to diminished, etc. After all, you have gone from: which means you can play piano chords! Well take up augmented triadsthey are like the pepper of a musical meal, and youll see how easy they are to learn once you know major and minor and diminished chords!

In this lesson we are going to learn augmented chords. They are the pepper of a musical meal, much like the diminished triads were the salt of a musical meal.

Play each augmented triad in root position, then 1st inversion, then 2nd inversion. Then go through all 12 diminished chords, inverting each one up and down the keyboard each hand alone, then together. Then play the 12 augmented chords, up and down the keyboard.

Then skip around from major to minor to diminished to augmented, etc. When you can do that you ought to feel really, really, really optimistic about learning chords, because youve got a great start. Thats 12 dozena gross of piano chords! Thats more than most people learn in their entire lifeand youve learned them in 7 lessons!

In the next lesson we will add 24 more chords to our growing list of chords we can play. Now that we have covered all the triads 3 note chords , well take up 6th chordsthey are extensions of the basic major and minor chords.

And in Lesson 7, we took up augmented triadsformed by simply raising the 5th of a major triad. In this lesson we are going to learn major 6th chords. They are 4-note chordsthe root, 3rd, 5thjust like a major chord, but you also add the 6th degree of the scale to the major triad. And heres what they look like when played in root position: They appear in the same order as the notation abovebesides, you should be able to form them by now, since all there is to it is to add the 6th note of the scale to the major chord!

Now its up to you. Now add major 6th chords to your repertoire of chords. They are shown in root position above, but you know that you can turn them upside down till the cows come home invert themso go to it! When you can do that you ought to feel really, really, really, really optimistic about learning chords, because youre on your way!

After all, you have gone from: which means you can now play piano chords!

Next lesson we will add 12 more chords to our growing list of chords we can play by adding minor 6th chords to our stash. Actually 48 more chords, since each 4-note chord such as a minor 6th can be inverted 4 waysroot position, 1st inversion, 2nd inversion, and 3rd inversion.

If you recall, in Lesson 1 we learned about the three chords you absolutely, positively CANT do without. With Lesson 7 we took up augmented triadsformed by simply raising the 5th of a major triad, and we learned about major 6th chords in Lesson 8.

And heres what they look like on the piano keyboard when played in root position: As usual, now its up to you. Play each minor 6th chord in root position, then 1st inversion, then 2nd inversion, then in 3rd inversion the 6th will be the lowest note of the chord Play each chord up and down the keyboard for at least 2 octavesmaybe 3 octaves.

Next, add major 6th chords. Now add minor 6th chords to your repertoire of chords. Do you feel like youre getting a handle on chords yet?

You ought toI know were going slowly, but chords are SO important that you absolutely MUST master them if you are ever going to play the piano like you hope to! So heres our revised chord scorecard:to which means you can now play piano chords! Next lesson we will add 12 more chords to our growing list of chords we can play by adding 7th chords to our stash.

Actually 48 more chords, since each 4-note chord such as a 7th can be inverted 4 waysroot position, 1st inversion, 2nd inversion, and 3rd inversion.

With Lesson 7 we took up augmented triadsformed by simply raising the 5th of a major triad, we learned about major 6th chords in Lesson 8.

In this lesson, were going to take up 7th chordsvery important chords, because they move you from one tonal base to another tonal base.

In other words, when we move from the C chord to the F chord, we often use C7 between the two as a connector. Next lesson well take up the Major 7th chord, which uses the scale 7th. Heres what 7th piano chords look like on the staff: 7th Chords Remember that accidentals carry over in each measure! And heres what they look like when played with the left hand: They appear in the same order as before: 7th chords want to move up a perfect 4ththey dont have to, but that is their tendency.

So if you encounter a G7 chord, what is the next likely chord? Surea C chord. Because its a 4th higher than G. If you encountered an Eb7 chord, what is the most likely chord to follow it? Because Ab is a 4th above Eb. As usual, now its up to you. Play each 7th chord in root position, then 1st inversion, then 2nd inversion, then in 3rd inversion the 7th will be the lowest note of the chord Play each chord up and down the keyboard for at least 2 octavesmaybe 3 octaves.

Then add major 6th and minor 6th chords to your repertoire of chords. You know that you can turn them upside down till the cows come homeinvert themso go to it! And then add 7th chords and their inversions.

So heres our revised chord scorecard: which means you can now play over piano chords! Next lesson we will add 12 more chords to our growing list of chords we can play by adding major 7th chords to our stash.

Major 7th chords are less common, and are generally used as color chords to create a certain sound, a certain mood. To form a major 7th chord, simply add the 7th degree of the scale to the major triad. For example, you know that the C major triad is C - E - G. You also know that the C scale has 8 notes, the 7th of which is B. Heres what Major 7th chords look like on the staff: All 12 Major 7th Chords Remember that accidentals carry over in the same measure!

And heres what they look like when played with your left hand on the keyboard: As usual, now its up to you. Play each maj7th chord in root position, then 1st inversion, then 2nd inversion, then in 3rd inversion the maj7th will be the lowest note of the chord Play each chord up and down the keyboard for at least 2 octavesmaybe 3 octaves. So heres our revised chord scorecard: which means you can now play over chords!

Next lesson we will add 12 more chords to our growing list of chords we can play by adding 9th chords to our stash. Actually 48 more chords, since each 4-note chord such as a 9th can be inverted 4 waysroot position, 1st inversion, 2nd inversion, and 3rd inversion - and if your hand is big enoughmine isnt4th inversion.

All The 9th Piano Chords Last lesson we covered maj7th chords.

That was the last of the piano chords you can play without doing some fancy maneuvering. Today were going to learn 9th chords, and from now on we will be inverting the chords and using a 2-step process to play the piano chords.

A 9th chord is made up of a root, a 3rd, a 5th, a 7th not the maj7th - just the 7th plus the 9th note of the scale, which of course is the same as the 2nd note of the scale, but an octave higher.

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Whats the problem with a 5 note piano chord? Nothing, except if your hand is small like mine. I cant reach all 5 keys, so I had to come up with another way to position the chord on the keyboard. What we do is this: You may be saying But how could that be a C9 chord?

It doesnt have a C in it! And you would be right. So what we need to do is to play the Cthe root of the chordan octave below middle C while we depress the sustain pedal, and then play the chord shown above. The sustain pedal hooks the two parts together to make one cohesive chorda C9. So if you want to play an F9 chord, you would play a low F the root of the F chord low on the keyboard, then play the F9 chord while the sustain pedal is depressed.

Same for any other 9th chordplay the low root, then the chord. Heres what 9th chords look like on the staff: All the 9th Chords Remember that accidentals carry over in the same measure! And heres what they look like when played with your left hand on the keyboard: But dont forget: you MUST play a low note the root of the chord before you play the chord, then hook them together with your sustain pedal!

Play each 9th chord in root position, then 1st inversion, then 2nd inversion, then in 3rd inversion the maj7th will be the lowest note of the chord. Then finally, add these 9th chords into the mixbut dont forget to play the low root before playing the chordthats a must! So heres our revised chord scorecard: which means you can now play Over piano chords!

Next lesson we will add 12 more chords to our growing list of chords we can play by adding 11th chords to our stash. I Lesson 3 showed you how easy it is to learn ALL the major chords there are 12 of them and be able to play them in seconds. Next you learned how to easily turn major chords into minor chords just by moving one key one-half stepby lowering the 3rd of the major chord.

Then we learned inversionshow to stand chords on their head. And finally, we took up augmented triadsformed by simply raising the 5th of a major triad. Then we learned about major 6th chords. Then we took up 7th chordsvery important chords, because they move you from one tonal base to another tonal base. After that we learned about major 7th chords, and finally, 9th chords. Today were going to learn to form an 11th chord.

Its just like the 9th chord, except you move your left thumb up from the 3rd of the chord to the 4thwhich in this case is known as the 11th, because it includes a 9th and a 7th under it.

And heres what they look like when played with the left hand: Go through all 12 major chords, inverting every one. So heres our revised chord scorecard: which means you can now play at least piano chords!

Next lesson we will add 12 more chords to our growing list of piano chords we can play by adding 13th chords to our stash. Actually 60 more chords, since each 5-note chord such as a 13th can be inverted 5 waysroot position, 1st inversion, 2nd inversion, 3rd inversion, and 4th inversion! All The 13th Piano Chords Another one of the most exciting chord types youll ever learn If you recall, in Lesson 1 we learned about the three chords you absolutely, positively CANT do without.

We took up 7th chords in Lesson 10very important chords, because they move you from one tonal base to another tonal base. After that we learned about major 7th chords, and then, 9th chords, and then 11th chords. Today were going to learn to form an 13th chord. Its just like the 11th chord, except you move your little finger up from the 5th of the chord to the 13 thsame as the 6th, except the chord includes the 7th, 9th, and 11th. Heres what 13th piano chords look like on the staff: All the 13th Chords Remember that accidentals carry over in each measure!

And heres what they look like on the staff when played with the left hand: Now - go through all 12 major chords, inverting every one. Then go through all 12 diminished chords, inverting each one up and down the keyboardeach hand alone, then together. Then add major 6th and minor 6th chords to your rehearsal schedule. In one octave, yet - and there are 7 octaves on a full piano keyboard!

Next lesson we will investigate diminished 7th chords. So be sure to master 13ths before next lesson. The 3 Diminished 7th Piano Chords Diminished 7th chords are unique animals. They have some unusual qualities that make them interesting and useable. For example, they are the only type of chord that is simply a stack of minor 3rds.

If you count from one chord note to the next, you will find that they are all equidistant. This is what they look like on paper: There are really only 3 diminished 7th Piano Chords: When we get into chord progressions, we will see that diminished 7th chords can be used as modulation agents, transposition agents, and transition agents. They can transform themselves into 7th chords by just moving any one note.

They can also be changed into 6th chords and major 7th chords with a minimum of movement. Each of the 3 diminished 7th chords contain two of the mysterious tri-tones, which we will take up later when we get into chord progressions. So learn them well in ALL inversions.

Chord Suspensions Suspensions are chords in which the 4th degree of the scale takes the place of the 3rd degreeusually temporarily, but not always. Its just that easy. Replace the 3rd of the chord with the 4th, and youve got it! Thats all there is to it. Heres how these same chords look when notated: Next time well investigate altered chords. Meanwhile, be sure to review all the previous lessonsfrom major triads to 13ths.

Alterations So far weve covered chords from major to minor to diminished to augmented to 6ths to 7ths to maj7ths to 9ths to 1lths to 13thsand last time we covered suspensions. Were almost throughalmost to the point where we can apply what weve learned about chords to chord progressionsand thats where the fun begins. You would play a low root C first and hold it with your sustain pedal, then play this chord, which is in first inversion.

This is an advanced voicingwere leaving the 5th of the chord out, so we have a stack of 4ths, which creates an open sound. Now that you know what it is, try it.

Sometimesbut not oftenyoull see a symbol that says add 2 That simply means to add the 2nd note of the scale the scale of the chord you are playing to the chord. The reason it is not called a 9th is because a 9th has a 7th under it, and this doesnt. It is notated Cadd2 and looks like this: Thats enough for this time.

I dont want you to get musical indigestion. Slash Chords A slash chord is a hybrid kind of chord. It simply means play the given chord OVER the note after the slash. In other words, in this example, we would have a C chord played, but the lowest note would be Ab which of course is not in the C chord.

Whats usually going on are passing tones that comprise a type of counter melody. Heres an example of a slash chord: Slash chords are just chords that have a bottom note other than the rootsometimes notes that arent in the chord at all.

So you might encounter: Try all those on for size. Just remember that the letter to the left tells what chord it is, and the letter after the slash tells what the lowest note of the chord should be.

How could I do it? Minor 7th chords are some of the most-used chords there are. They are also the mellowest chords aroundentire songs have been composed using nothing but minor 7th chords, and even more songs composed with a combination of minor 7ths and maj7th chords. So dont think they are not important.

Just chalk it up to the fact that its easy to overlook the obvious. And thats exactly what I did. Minor 7th chords are made of a minor 3rd with a major third over it and a minor 3rd over that.

In other words, every other interval is minor, and every other interval is major. For example, on Cm7 it is a minor 3rd from C to Eb. Then it is a major 3rd from Eb to G. Then it is a minor 3rd from G to Bb. And heres what they look like: Play them over and over until you get the feel of each one. Then try playing them with your left hand while playing one or more of them broken in the right hand. Thats the very beginning of improvisation! Chord Progressions Part One The Circle of Keys - Major If youve ever heard of the circle of 4ths or the circle of 5ths, they are the same thing as the circle of keys.

It just depends on whether youre moving clockwise or counter-clockwise around the circle. All the major keys that you can play in12 of emare listed in this circle. Take a look for yourself: Major Keys: So C is at the top of your circle, and Gb same as F is at the bottom of your circle. Now memorize that circle. Youll soon notice that each letter is a 4th above the previous letterhence, the circle of 4ths.

Or if you go the other way, youll soon notice that each letter is a 5th above the previous letterhence, the circle of 5ths. For example, if the chord you are playing is C, the most likely chord to occur next is either F or G. You will notice that F comes directly to the right of C on the circle, and G directly to the left.

Now you know why! So that means that at any point on the circle you can immediately know the most likely chordsthe chord to the left, and the chord to the right! Heres a quiz: What are the 3 most likely chords in the key of Db?

Db of course , plus the chords on either side of itAb and Gb. So what we come out with is thisthe most likely chords in each key: Do you see what an enormous advantage this gives you? You have a highly educated guess what chords are going to occur in the song you are playing based on the key that the song is written in.

Not only that, you now know that chords like to either move up a 4th or a 5th or down a 4th or 5thsame thing. And so as we begin learning chord progressions, this is the first stepmemorize the circle above until you can say it forward and backward and upside down and in your sleep!

If I were you, I would print it out and stick it up on your piano or bathroom mirror or wherever you would see it oftenits that important. Thats all for this time. Next lesson well take a look at the Circle of Minor Keysgiving you the same insight in any minor key. Chord Progressions Part Two The Circle of Minor Keys Last week we looked at the circle of 4ths or the circle of 5ths, they are the same thing as the circle of keys.

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All the major keys that you can play in12 of em are listed in this circle: Major Keys: But there are also 12 minor keys in which songs can be written, so there must also be a circle of minor keys. Its not as well known as the circle of major keys, but it works the same way. Here it is: It works the same way as the major circle of keys, with one exception: When figuring the 3 most likely chords in any key, you still look left and look right, but because of the fact that most songs written in the western hemisphere use the harmonic minor scale instead of the natural minor scale which is much too involved to get into here if you want to know about that in detail youll need to get a course on scales , the chord to the left is usually a MAJOR chord instead of a minor chord.

There are some exceptions to that, but not many. So what we come out with is thisthe most likely chords in each minor key: Soto repeat from the last lesson: Do you see what an enormous advantage this gives you? Next lesson well see how you can quickly tell what key a song is in, therefore telling you in advance what chords are the most likely!

Here's a free printable piano chords chart PDF for beginners! In this easy piano lesson you'll get tips on how to use this chord chart for piano playing. You'll also learn how chords are built and get tips on how get started playing chord piano.

Have fun! It has easy, beautiful songs to practice playing easy chords to, and making faking your own accompaniments. A piano chords chart is a handy tool especially when you start learning how to play chords.

This chord chart shows you the most common chords in root position; major, minor, diminished, 7th chords and Major 7th chords in all keys.

Click on the link below the image to get your PDF.

The Piano Chords Fun Book™ | A Beginner's Guide to Accompanying (Digital Print)

How to Use a Piano Chords Chart First pick a piece with chord markings and melody, or just lyrics and chords. You can use anything you like for guitar with chord tabs as well- since chord names for piano are the same. Highlight the different chords that are used- it might seem like there are a lot, but usually there are only a few chords, or a specific chord progression.

Study the piano chords chart and learn the patterns how they look of the chords you'll be using. Then, practice the chords in the order of the song, until fluent. Finally, sing or hum the melody of the piece you picked, playing the chords at the right words! A chord consists of three or more notes played together.Clearly Labeled Notes On The Piano Keyboard - Easy to read picture diagrams for each chord makes it simple to know what notes to play for every chord.

Musical Interval Recognition. When practicing scales you can choose whether it's the notes or the finger numbers that appear on keyboard.

As a visual learner you can quickly see the patterns and make sense of the use of fingering, especially with scales. Chord progressions[ edit ] This as you might have noticed is a chord progression. Try getting songs that use the chords you know and play along with the songs.